Learn about API technical writing in Washington DC

Are you a technical writer in or around Washington DC? On Friday March 20th, I’m running a full-day workshop on API technical writing. It’s free, and you’re very welcome to attend. There’s free food too!

The workshop is happening under the auspices of the the STC Washington, DC – Baltimore Chapter. The content is the same as that of the workshop I ran in Mountain View in January, with a few updates based on feedback from participants.

API stands for Application Programming Interface. Developers use APIs to make apps that communicate with other apps and software/hardware components. API technical writers create documentation and other content that helps developers hook their apps up to someone else’s API. For a tech writer, it’s an exciting, challenging and rewarding field.

Workshop details

Date: Friday, March 20th, 2015
Time: 9 am to 4 pm
Cost: None. The workshop is given free of charge.
Location: Room: “The White Space”, 9th Floor, 25 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20001 (map: http://goo.gl/A4FqJ8). A parking garage is connected to the building. To see parking rates and hours, search for the address on the parking locator.

This is a practical course on API technical writing, consisting of lectures interspersed with hands-on sessions where you’ll apply what you’ve learned. The focus is on APIs themselves as well as on documentation, since we need to be able to understand and use a product before we can document it.

The workshop includes the following sessions:

  • Lecture: Introduction to APIs, including a demo of some REST and JavaScript APIs.
  • Hands-on: Play with a REST API.
  • Lecture: JavaScript essentials.
  • Hands-on: Play with a JavaScript API.
  • Lecture: The components of API documentation and other developer aids.
  • Hands-on: Generate reference documentation using Javadoc.
  • Lecture: Beyond Javadoc – other doc generation tools.

Preparation for the workshop

Please take a look at the event announcement to see what you need to install on your laptop before the workshop. Doing the recommended installations will save you a lot of time at the workshop so that you can avoid missing crucial bits when you’re there.

More details and signup

The event announcement by the STC Washington, DC – Baltimore Chapter has more details. To register for the workshop, scroll down to the Eventbrite box on that page, or go straight to the Eventbrite registration page.

I’m looking forward to meeting DC technical writers. Hope to see you there!

Screen Shot 2015-02-21 at 6.10.38 am

Delete or remove?

What’s the difference between delete and remove? When should you use the word “delete” on a user interface or in a document, and when “remove”? Here’s an explanation that makes sense to me.

Use “delete” when you’re getting rid of the thing entirely – when it’s disappearing from the data store. Use “remove” when you’re subtracting it from a group or a list, but it remains available in the data store.

An example is the model of users and groups. Let’s say the user arthurdent belongs to two groups: spacers and earthlings. When Arthur no longer lives on planet Earth, you would remove arthurdent from the earthlings group. But if Arthur has departed the universe without leaving so much as a towel behind, you would delete the username arthurdent.

Here’s another example. Let’s say you have a number of credit card charges, which you’re adding to two expense reports. By mistake, you’ve added one of the charges to Expense Report 1 as well as Expense Report 2.  So you need to remove that charge from the report. In addition, there’s an erroneous credit card charge of zero dollars, which you can delete without adding it to a report.

Delete or remove

Works for me. :) What do you think?

Introduction to API tech writing – upcoming webinar

On Wednesday February 11th, US EST (that’s Thursday here in Australia), I’m presenting a webinar about API technical writing. It’s the first in a series on API technical writing from the Society for Technical Communication. I’d love it if you could join me online.

The role of API technical writer is exciting, rewarding, and challenging. I’ve been working as a full-time API writer for 18 months now, and I love it!

APIs are a hot topic in our field, and technical writers with the skills to document them are in high demand. Many technical writers are keen to know more about the role, but it can be hard to find information. Sometimes there’s so much information that it’s difficult to know where to start. In presenting this webinar, my aim is to give you a good idea of the role of API technical writer, and some excellent starting points to explore the world of APIs.

Details of the webinar

Title: Introduction to API Technical Writing.
Date and time: Wednesday, 11 February 2015, at 2pm EST (GMT-5) – that’s 6am on Thursday here in Sydney!
Duration: One hour.
Fees and registration/signup: Please refer to the STC announcement: Part 1 in API Series: Introduction to API Technical Writing.

The session covers the following topics:

  • What an API is and does.
  • Introduction to the role of API technical writer and our audience.
  • Overview of the types of developer products we may be asked to document – APIs and others.
  • Types of APIs, including REST APIs, other web services, library-based APIs like JavaScript, and more.
  • A couple of live demos of APIs that you can play with at home: a JavaScript API and a REST API.
  • Examples of good API documentation.
  • The components of API documentation, and the technical writer’s role in the creation of each component.
  • A day in the life of an API technical writer.
  • Tips on getting started in the role.

Here’s a link to the slides on SlideShare: API Technical Writing.

Introduction to API technical writing

More in the STC’s webinar series on API technical writing

Following on from my introductory webinar, the next two sessions in the STC’s series have already been announced. In episode 2, Ed Marshall talks about documentating Java and C++ APIs. In episode 3, Joe Malin describes how to write effective code samples.

I hope to “see” you at the webinar!

Talking of technical communicators who write books

Many technical writers do other types of writing too. This week I had the pleasure and privilege of meeting one of them in person. Cynthia Chin-Lee is a manager in information development at Oracle, and also the author of a number of books. She made me a present of two of them – such a generous gesture.

One of the books Cynthia gave me is Amelia to Zora, Twenty-Six Women Who Changed the World. Cynthia is the author, and the illustrations are by Megan Halsey and Sean Addy.

Amelia to Zora - book cover

Each page is about a woman who’s done amazing, beautiful, world-changing things with her life. Cynthia has managed to pack an enormous amount into just a few words about each person, with a quotation from each one. The illustrations by Megan and Sean are unusual and lovely. My favourite is the page about Imogen Cunningham, a photographer:

Amelia to Zora - a page in the book

The second book Cynthia gave me is Operation Marriage, a story about a family of four: two mothers and two children. The mothers are gay, and at the start of the book they haven’t yet married. When they first decided to commit their lives to each other, marriage of gay couples was not legal in their part of the world. The story tells how their two children get together to persuade them to marry.

Cynthia Chin-Lee is the author and Lea Lyon is the illustrator.

Operation Marriage - book cover

The story is sensitively and neatly told, and the illustrations are just gorgeous. This is my favourite page, showing the family settled down on the couch to watch a video of the mothers’ commitment ceremony:

You can find details of the books on Cynthia’s website. Thank you Cynthia for a thoughtful gift.

API explorers – play with a REST API the easy way

To communicate with a REST API (or other web service API), you need to construct a request, send it over HTTP or HTTPS, then receive and parse the response. When creating an app, you do all that with code. But what if you just want to take a look around the API to see what it offers, before diving into the code? API explorers are your friend.

I’ve been putting together some information for a workshop on API technical writing. It’s been a rewarding exercise, because it’s made me think in a structured, educational way about what I do every day. A section of the workshop deals with various online API explorers that I’ve discovered over an extended period of time. This information is likely to be useful to many people, so I’m sharing it in a blog post.

API explorers offer a handy GUI alternative to a command-line tool like cURL. This blog post introduces the Advanced REST Client, which is a generic GUI for interacting with any REST API, and a few API explorers that interact with specific APIs.

Advanced REST Client

The Advanced REST Client is an add-on for Chrome browser. I find it very useful for sending a request to a REST API and receiving the response.

The Advanced REST Client offers a generic web form that you can use to craft an HTTP request, submit the request, and see the response. The screenshot below shows the Advanced REST Client in a Chrome tab. The top text box contains a request for the Flickr REST API. You can see the URL path and the URL parameters specifying the options needed for this particular request: the method (get public photos), the user ID of the person whose photos you want, and an API key.

(Click the image to see a larger version.)

There are more, similar add-ons for Chrome, such as the REST Console and Postman. I haven’t looked at extensions for other browsers, but I’m guessing there are similar tools for them too.

Explorers for specific APIs

Developers of REST APIs and other web service APIs sometimes offer an API explorer, which people can use to take a look around the API before diving into the code.

The principle is the same as the Advanced REST client: an API explorer provides an online form where you can enter the parameters required for an API request, submit the request, and see the results.

The difference is that an API explorer is written for a specific API, whereas the Advanced REST Client is generic. The explorer therefore knows more about the API that it’s accessing. It can therefore:

  • Present specific input boxes for the expected URL parameters and the input data expected in the request body.
  • Hide such pesky complexities as user authentication. In many cases, you can sign in as a user of the web service, and the API explorer will create any authentication tokens that you need.

Flickr REST API Explorer

To see Flickr’s API explorer in action, you can experiment with requesting a user’s public photos from Flickr. Follow these steps to use the flickr.people.getPublicPhotos method in the API explorer:

  1. Go to this link in your browser: https://www.flickr.com/services/api/explore/flickr.people.getPublicPhotos
    You should see Flickr’s App Garden, showing a form with input fields for the arguments required in the request for public photos.
  2. Enter the following values:
    • user_id: Paste in the Flickr user ID of the user whose public photos you wish to retrieve. A user ID is a string of characters with an @ sign in the middle. For example, use your own Flickr user ID or feel free to use mine: 31065906@N08.
    • Leave all the optional arguments empty.
    • Output: Select XML (REST). This is the default option.
    • Authentication: Select Do not sign call. (Flickr does not require authentication for this particular API request.)
  3. Click Call Method.
  4. Scroll down to see the response. The API explorer returns the response body, and a copy of the request URL.

This screenshot shows the input fields for the flickr.people.getPublicPhotos call:

Flickr API Explorer

To find all the methods available in Flickr’s API explorer, go to this web page:  https://www.flickr.com/services/api/

The methods are listed down the right-hand side of the page. For example, to find the method you’ve used earlier:

  • Click the link on the words flickr.people.getPublicPhotos. You’ll see a documentation page about the getPublicPhotos method.
  • Scroll to the bottom, and click the link to the API Explorer for the method.

Twitter REST API Explorer

Twitter’s REST API requires user authentication for every request. The API explorer is especially useful in this case, because it takes care of the authentication plumbing for you. All you need to do is give the explorer permission to access Twitter’s data via your Twitter username. Twitter uses the OAuth 1.0 protocol to authenticate the user. In this case, you’re the user, because you’re using the API explorer. This will all become clear if you follow the steps below. :)

  1. Go to the Twitter website and sign in as usual. (You do need a Twitter account to try this exercise.)
  2. Go to the Twitter API explorer at Exploring the Twitter API.
  3. Click the dropdown arrow under Authentication and select OAuth 1.
  4. A popup window appears, titled Request Twitter permissions. If you can’t see it, scroll down the page a bit.
  5. Click Sign in with Twitter.
  6. A window appears, titled Authorize Apigee’s API Console to use your account?
  7. Click Authorize app.
  8. You should see a short-lived message saying that you’ll be redirected back to the app. Then you’ll find yourself back in the Twitter API explorer. Under Authentication, you’ll see Twitter-<username> where <username> is your Twitter handle. For example, for me it shows “Twitter-sarahmaddox”.
  9. Under Select an API method, you’ll see a list of methods – these are the things you can do with the API. Click /statuses/user_timeline.json in the first set of methods (next to one of the blue “GET” buttons).
  10. A new set of panels appears. In the Query panel (the smallish panel near the top of the window), scroll down until you can see the user_id and screen_name fields. They’re right at the bottom of the panel, and not immediately visible. In the screenshot below, I’ve already scrolled down within the Query panel.
  11. Enter a Twitter username and screen name. In this screenshot, I’ve entered my own Twitter ID:
    TwitterAPI explorer
  12. Click Send. (The red button near top right.)
  13. A short-lived red-flashing message appears, letting you know the app is working. Then the response appears. If you see a green 200 OK, that means everything went well.
  14. Scroll down to see the full response. It’s in JSON format. The top part of it looks like this (but there’s much more):
    Twitter API explorer

Various Google APIs

The Google APIs Explorer provides a GUI interface for many of the Google APIs, including the Calendar API, the Gmail API, and many more:

Google APIs Explorer

Happy exploring!

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