My trees and this blog are one year old

In August last year, I planted two trees at about the same time as I started this blog. Now the trees and this blog are just over a year old. A good opportunity for some stats🙂

ffeathers

WordPress says that ffeathers has:

  • 62 posts
  • 184 comments
  • 184 tags (hmm, interesting but meaningless coincidence)
  • 17,216 total views
  • 7,584 blocked spam comments (thank you Akismet)

The most popular post is The agile technical writer with 1,247 views.

Today, someone found ffeathers by Googling for:

“your mouse has moved” error

I hope you found what you were looking for🙂

Prickly Paperbark

Yesterday, another person came here searching for:

paperbark tree information on growth

So in your honour, here’s some idea of what a Paperbark tree does in a year.

The Prickly Paperbark was a tube, about 40cm high, when I planted it in August last year. Now it’s nearly 2 metres high and quite robust. (It needs to be robust, to survive the onslaught of weeds, floods, cold and heat that our garden inflicts upon it.)

Prickly Paperbark a year ago, at 40cm

Prickly Paperbark a year ago, at 40cm

Prickly Paperbark now, at 198cm

Prickly Paperbark now, at 198cm

It has a very pretty trunk and bark already. The diameter of the trunk is almost 3cm at its thickest part.

Prickly Paperbark close-up

Prickly Paperbark close-up

Old Man Banksia

The Banksia has not grown much since I last measured it in April this year. It’s approximately one metre tall, and battling an ever-changing environment. Since I planted it, a couple of tree ferns have muscled in on the territory.

Old Man Banksia last year, at 17cm

Old Man Banksia last year, at 17cm

Old Man Banksia now, at approx 1 metre

Old Man Banksia now, at approx 1 metre

Still, it is putting up a gallant fight. Its trunk is almost 2cm in diameter and it always has a lot of new growth, although much of it goes sideways in an attempt to find the sun.

Old Man Banksia close-up

Old Man Banksia close-up

As well as my two favourites, we planted around 20 native trees and shrubs last year. Spring has sprung, and we’ll be shopping for more soon. Death to all agapanthus😉

About Sarah Maddox

Technical writer, author and blogger in Sydney

Posted on 9 September 2008, in environment, trees and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Congrats on your blog’s anniversary!

  2. Thank you Sarah🙂

  3. Death to all agapanthus!!! What’s up with that? Are you referring to this beautiful agapanthus – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agapanthus?

    Congrats on the 1 yr old blog. I am learning to embrace Confluence.

    Shannon

  4. “… this beautiful agapanthus.” — heh heh, yes that’s the one.

    I’ve got nothing against it in its own right (well, not much anyway😉 ) but it’s a bit of a pest here in Australia. It’s not native, but it does aggressively well and smothers the indigenous plants. Its root system tends to wreak havoc on the rock faces too.

    I guess you could respond with much the same thing about me. I’m not native to Australia. In fact, both the Agapanthus and I come from the same part of the world😉

    Have fun with Confluence. I hope it’s hugging you back!

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