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New Trilby Trench action novel – Words Words Words

I’m thrilled to announce the publication of the latest Trilby Trench action book, Words Words Words!

Trilby Trench’s worst nightmare comes true. Her friend Bonnie goes missing. The last message from Bonnie came from a remote location in Australia’s Top End. Since then, nothing. Has Bonnie simply gone walkabout, or has some mishap befallen her? It’s up to Trilby to find out.

There are times when words are evil. Times when words cause nothing but trouble and strife. That’s when you need someone who knows their way around a sentence and around a fight. Someone like Trilby Trench.

The complete book, Words Words Words, is available on Amazon as a Kindle ebook (USD $3.99) and as a paperback (USD $8.99).

Looking for a quick taste of the story? I’ll publish a few chapters on the Trilby Trench site. Chapter 1 is available now.

The Trilby Trench action adventures so far:

  • The first book in the Trilby Trench action series is A Word If You Please. It’s quite short – the length of a novella. It’s a great introduction to Trilby and friends. You can read the entire book here on the Trilby Trench site, as well as getting it in Kindle or paperback from Amazon.
  • The latest book, Words Words Words, is a full-length novel. The book contains around 67,000 words, and the paperback version is 361 pages.

If you’ve read either of the books and would like to add a book review on Amazon, that’d be awesome! Here’s my author’s page.

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The art, and the power, of saying no

Recently, I needed to let a product team know that our tech writing team couldn’t take on the task of creating a particular doc. The doc was outside our normal area of responsibility, but one where we could certainly have added value. The problem was, we just didn’t have bandwidth. My manager showed me a published procedure which outlines our priorities. It was very useful to be able to refer the product team to the procedure, and to have at my disposal those words in the procedure which had been so carefully written for just this sort of situation. I was also able to offer the product manager our help in reviewing the doc once the engineering and product teams had created it.

This experience led me to think about the art, and the power, of saying no.

Saying no feels bad. You’re letting the side down. You and your team are underachieving.

Not so. I’ve come to the realisation that saying no is a good thing, provided it’s done under the right circumstances and in the right way. It’s good not only for you, but also for the people you say no to, for your manager, and for your team members. Even more, it’s good for the organisation as a whole.

How so?

When an organisation has had the luxury of a tech writer or two for a while, people start appreciating the skills we offer. They start asking us to create documents that are urgent, high profile, sales critical, and more, but that are sometimes outside our scope.

It’s fine to help out if the tech writing team has time. But often the team is fully taken up in other work that’s of equally high priority, and which is part of our primary responsibility. In such cases, it does the team and the organisation a disservice to say yes. Writers will end up working overtime, or the  docs under our primary care will suffer.

If we say no, people in the organisation may realise they need to hire more tech writers. In many cases they already know they need more writers, and our saying no can give them the data they need for their hiring requests.

Tips

If time allows, it’s good to be able to offer a little more than just a “no”. Here are a few ideas. Some of them involve preparation ahead of time, under the assumption that you’ll have to say no at some time:

  • Write up your team’s policy and responsibilities clearly, so you have somewhere to direct people to when they ask the impossible. Don’t be afraid to adjust the policy doc as time goes on, and as your team changes or you discover more situations which you can or cannot support. The team’s policy is not set in stone. It changes with your team, your stakeholders’ teams, and the organisation as a whole.
  • If you have a helpful suggestion or recommendation, include it when you say no. For example, point people to templates and style guides that will help them write the doc themselves. Look for existing documentation that may be similar to what they want.
  • If you have the bandwidth, offer to review the final draft after another team has created it and pushed it through initial review.
  • Encourage the product and engineering teams to contribute to the docs on an ongoing basis, so that they’ll feel able to write their own doc in this sort of situation. Create a quick-start guide to your doc tools and review procedures, and point them to that guide. On the topic of writing such a guide, you may find this post useful: the importance of audience.

Have you found yourself in a position where you’ve had to say no, even though you know that you and your team would add value to a task if you had bandwidth? I’d love to hear any tips you have on how to handle this sort of situation, and what you’ve learned from saying no.

Publishing a paperback on Kindle Direct Publishing

The printed copy of my book has arrived! That’s a good reason to talk about publishing a paperback via Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing.

First, the long-awaited arrival of a printed copy of my book, A Word If You Please. I published the book on Amazon.com in Kindle and paperback formats. Being all the way down here in Australia, it was a couple of weeks before my hard copy arrived. And now, here it is:

  

It’s about an action hero, Trilby Trench, who also happens to be a technical writer. Does her way with words bring the danger to her or does it save her from further troubles? Only Trilby can tell you that.

Publishing a paperback on KDP

It’s been a while since I last ventured into the online tools provided by Kindle Direct Publishing. I’ve previously published two novels in Kindle format.

It was a very pleasant surprise that you can now create and publish a paperback version of your book. When I last published via Kindle Direct Publishing, only the Kindle format was available. The cost model for the paperback format is print on demand: You pay Amazon a fee for each copy that someone buys.

I loved the online cover designer. You can choose your design from a range of templates. There are different templates for Kindle ebook and paperback. Upload your image, customise the colours and fonts, and submit the design.

Only one thing didn’t work quite as expected. When you publish both a Kindle version and a paperback version of the same book, they start off as separate books on Amazon.com. It’s a good idea to get them linked, so people looking at the book online can see that both formats are available. The linking is supposed to happen automatically, based on identical title, author, and some other metadata. The auto-linkage didn’t happen for me, so I contacted the Kindle Direct Publishing help desk. They replied to my request within a few hours, and the update came through within 24 hours. Excellent service!

It’s worth spending some time reading the Kindle Direct Publishing documentation, to figure out how to upload and format your content. I decided to use straight HTML for the paperback version of my book. If you go that route, you may find this article useful: How to make an Amazon Kindle book using HTML and CSS. The author of that blog post has recently posted a disclaimer saying the post is out of date. Even so, I found the overview useful, and the downloadable set of sample files too.

Trilby Trench book now Kindle and paperback

The first book of my new Trilby Trench series is now available on Amazon.com as a Kindle ebook and in paperback form. Trilby Trench is an action hero who also happens to be a technical writer. She’s deft with words, analytic in thought, and skilled in everything that she’s written about. That covers a lot of ground. Things happen to Trilby, and she happens right back at them.

The book title is A Word If You Please. You can get it here:

I first published A Word If You Please in serial form, chapter by chapter, on the Trilby Trench site. Last week I went through the very interesting process of publishing the book with Kindle Direct Publishing, both as a Kindle book and in paperback.

If you order quickly, you just may see the paperback before I do. 🙂 I’ve ordered one, but it hasn’t arrived yet. It has to make its way from the US all the way to Australia. So I have no idea what it looks like in real life, or what it feels like to hold.

Review, anyone?

If you’ve read the book and are happy to put a review on Amazon, that’d be awesome!

Chapter 2 of the adventures of Trilby Trench

Have things improved, or is Trilby Trench still in a pickle? Read A Word If You Please, chapter 2 to find out!

A Word If You Please is the first book in an online fiction series about Trilby Trench, tech writer and action hero. Don’t worry if you missed chapter 1 – you can still read it and get to know Trilby Trench. See the about page on her site. You can also subscribe to updates on the site, to make sure you don’t miss out again. 🙂

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