Blog Archives

Publishing a paperback on Kindle Direct Publishing

The printed copy of my book has arrived! That’s a good reason to talk about publishing a paperback via Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing.

First, the long-awaited arrival of a printed copy of my book, A Word If You Please. I published the book on Amazon.com in Kindle and paperback formats. Being all the way down here in Australia, it was a couple of weeks before my hard copy arrived. And now, here it is:

  

It’s about an action hero, Trilby Trench, who also happens to be a technical writer. Does her way with words bring the danger to her or does it save her from further troubles? Only Trilby can tell you that.

Publishing a paperback on KDP

It’s been a while since I last ventured into the online tools provided by Kindle Direct Publishing. I’ve previously published two novels in Kindle format.

It was a very pleasant surprise that you can now create and publish a paperback version of your book. When I last published via Kindle Direct Publishing, only the Kindle format was available. The cost model for the paperback format is print on demand: You pay Amazon a fee for each copy that someone buys.

I loved the online cover designer. You can choose your design from a range of templates. There are different templates for Kindle ebook and paperback. Upload your image, customise the colours and fonts, and submit the design.

Only one thing didn’t work quite as expected. When you publish both a Kindle version and a paperback version of the same book, they start off as separate books on Amazon.com. It’s a good idea to get them linked, so people looking at the book online can see that both formats are available. The linking is supposed to happen automatically, based on identical title, author, and some other metadata. The auto-linkage didn’t happen for me, so I contacted the Kindle Direct Publishing help desk. They replied to my request within a few hours, and the update came through within 24 hours. Excellent service!

It’s worth spending some time reading the Kindle Direct Publishing documentation, to figure out how to upload and format your content. I decided to use straight HTML for the paperback version of my book. If you go that route, you may find this article useful: How to make an Amazon Kindle book using HTML and CSS. The author of that blog post has recently posted a disclaimer saying the post is out of date. Even so, I found the overview useful, and the downloadable set of sample files too.

Advertisements

Trilby Trench book now Kindle and paperback

The first book of my new Trilby Trench series is now available on Amazon.com as a Kindle ebook and in paperback form. Trilby Trench is an action hero who also happens to be a technical writer. She’s deft with words, analytic in thought, and skilled in everything that she’s written about. That covers a lot of ground. Things happen to Trilby, and she happens right back at them.

The book title is A Word If You Please. You can get it here:

I first published A Word If You Please in serial form, chapter by chapter, on the Trilby Trench site. Last week I went through the very interesting process of publishing the book with Kindle Direct Publishing, both as a Kindle book and in paperback.

If you order quickly, you just may see the paperback before I do. 🙂 I’ve ordered one, but it hasn’t arrived yet. It has to make its way from the US all the way to Australia. So I have no idea what it looks like in real life, or what it feels like to hold.

Review, anyone?

If you’ve read the book and are happy to put a review on Amazon, that’d be awesome!

Chapter 2 of the adventures of Trilby Trench

Have things improved, or is Trilby Trench still in a pickle? Read A Word If You Please, chapter 2 to find out!

A Word If You Please is the first book in an online fiction series about Trilby Trench, tech writer and action hero. Don’t worry if you missed chapter 1 – you can still read it and get to know Trilby Trench. See the about page on her site. You can also subscribe to updates on the site, to make sure you don’t miss out again. 🙂

What does Stack Overflow’s new documentation feature mean for tech writing?

Stack Overflow has recently announced the public beta release of its new documentation feature. That is, Stack Overflow now provides a platform for crowd-sourced documentation relating to any number of products, for the people, by the people.

For those of us managing the docs for widely-used products in particular, this means our customers may soon have access to an alternative, crowd-sourced documentation set.

What an awesome experiment for us as technical writers to follow! We’ll be able to see at first hand what our customers know they need, in terms of information about our products. Because this is Stack Overflow, the documented products are likely to be APIs, SDKs, and other developer-focused tools and technologies.

What if the documentation on Stack Overflow turns out to be voluminous and extremely useful – where would that leave us as technical writers working on proprietary doc sets? I think it will give us the opportunity to streamline our content, focusing even more than we do now on ensuring our information is up to date, and that our information architecture is the best we can make it.

In other words, we can ensure our target audiences can find what they need, even when they don’t know yet what that is.

Technical writing is hard. Information architecture is hard. The Q&A side of Stack Overflow works extremely well, because it focuses on short snippets of content that answer a particular question. It’s going to be very interesting indeed to see how well the new documentation feature works, with the more narrative demands of technical documentation.

An issue I foresee is that people will be tempted to kick off a topic, and then tire half way through and end up providing a link to the official documentation. Is that a bad thing? Tech writing know-how says our readers find it disconcerting to have to click around to find their information. It’s OK in a Q&A format, but not so good in a tutorial or step-by-step guide.

I really like Stack Overflow’s focus on sample-driven documentation!

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this development. Where do you think it’ll go within the next few months, and how about within the next two years? Will it fizzle into nothingness, or explode into something huge and beautiful? Will the original Q&A form of Stack Overflow merge into the new documentation form, becoming something new?

Can a technical writer write fiction?

Can technical writers do other types of writing, in particular fiction? Oh yes indeed! I’ve just finished reading Dave Gash’s new science fiction novel, The ELI Event. It’s a lot of fun.

I fell in love with the characters, including the non-human ones. I chewed my nails in the tense moments, cried and laughed in the good moments, gritted my teeth when things went wrong. When it was all over I felt great satisfaction at the way things turned out, coupled with that sweet sorrow you get when you finish a good book.

The ELI Event

The ELI Event

Dave is a friend of mine. I met him at a technical communication conference two years ago, and we’ve bumped into each other at a couple of conferences since. He’s great. His other big talent is compiling and hosting geek trivia quizzes. 😉

At first I was worried that knowing Dave would spoil my experience of the book. Would I hear his voice speaking through the text, preventing that essential suspension of disbelief that good sci fi demands and facilitates? Even worse, would I feel obliged to enjoy the book? The answer is “No” on all counts. The book grabbed me from page 2 and pushed me through all the way to the end.

Why page 2? Well, it took me most of page 1 to forget my worries about knowing the author. I’m sure the book will grab you from page 1!

Here’s a challenge 😉

Can you find anything in The ELI Event to indicate that a technical writer wrote it?

Details of the book

Dave Gash provides the book in paperback and in Adobe ePub format. You can order it from his website: The ELI Event

Title: The ELI Event
Author: Dave Gash
Publisher: Dave Gash with Xlibris.
%d bloggers like this: