Blog Archives

More on open source and technical writing

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about how technical writers can help open source contributors get started, and in so doing ramp up our own contributions to open source projects. A colleague has now pointed me to another great post on a related theme: Documentation as a gateway to open source, by James Turnbull.

My post focuses on the complexity of the open source world, which makes it difficult for anyone to get started, even to make a small fix to the source code or the docs. As technical writers, we can help people jump at least the initial hurdles. We can add docs that describe how to complete any relevant licence agreement, edit a code file or a doc page,  send an update for review, and eventually submit the update to the repository. In documenting the process, we become our own test subjects, as we need to go through that very process in order to document it. Sound familiar? It’s what we do best.

James Turnbull’s post takes things further. He describes how to:

  • Find a project that you can contribute to.
  • Consider the etiquette of the open source community that you’ve chosen, before jumping in and making a contribution.
  • Decide what type of edits to make. Both James and I describe READMEs as a good place to start. James goes on to examine strings, errors, and commands, and a few other file types too.

If you’re interested in open source, I recommend James’s post. It’s a good read.

Invitation to a Tech Writing 101 workshop, Melbourne, November

Are you a software engineer wanting to learn the patterns of technical writing? Or a technical writer wanting to refresh the ABCs of our craft? Or someone who loves debating and exercising good writing styles? Join us for a Tech Writing 101 workshop in Melbourne, Australia, on Thursday, 15th November.

The workshop is part of the Write the Docs AU conference, and the cost of the workshop is included in the conference registration.

Quick reference

Workshop name: Tech Writing 101

Date & Time: Thursday, 15th November 2018, 2.30pm – 4.30pm

Location: Library at the Dock, 107 Victoria Harbour Promenade, Melbourne, Australia

Signup: Register for the Write the Docs AU conference

Prework and what to bring

Before attending the workshop, you need to do a small amount of pre-reading (about half an hour).

This is where you discover that tech writing patterns are interesting and fun.

On the day of the workshop, bring a laptop with a text editor and an internet (WiFi) connection to do the exercises.

Workshop overview

The workshop leads you through a series of exercises to improve the clarity, readability, and effectiveness of your writing. You’ll work in pairs, learning from an experienced Google technical writer (me) and from each other.

Topics include the importance of knowing your audience; what can go wrong when you use passive voice; how to avoid getting tangled up in long sentences and disorganised paragraphs; how lists have taken over the world.

By the end of the session you’ll also think differently about toothbrushes.

During the workshop, you’ll apply the principles you’ve read in the prework. We’ve found this method of learning is highly effective. And it’s just plain fun. The workshop has been run at SREcon in Europe 2017 and at SREcon in the US in 2018, where it was very well received. People said they came away with useful skills and cleaner teeth.

Who’s welcome

The intended audience for the workshop is people who’re interested in learning how to write efficiently and effectively. That includes software developers, support engineers, UX specialists, product managers, technical writers, editors – well, really, everyone who needs to write technical content.

I hope to see you there!

Instead of a picture of a toothbrush (as that’d be a spoiler) here are some patterns from a recent walk in the bush:

Two Australian tech writing conferences just around the corner

Are you in or near Australia in October and November? Then you’re in for a treat. We have two technical writing conferences in a row, within a stone’s throw of each other. Well, for some definition of “stone’s throw”, anyway. 😉

First up is the annual conference of the Australian Society for Technical Communication, which takes place in Surfers Paradise on 12-13 October. The conference theme is Let’s get technical, technical. Learn about CSS smart selectors, rethinking DITA, speeding up your web pages, blockchain, impossible docs, becoming an efficient writer, Simplified Technical English, and more. Follow up with a focused workshop on web coding. Check the list of presentations and fill in the registration form.

Next up is the Write the Docs AU conference in Melbourne on 15-16 November. This is the second WtD AU conference ever, following on from last year’s debut. This event offers a mix of presentations, lightning talks, workshops, and unconference sessions. Check out the schedule and get a ticket.

Found on a walk in the bush – patterns on the bottom of a squashed mushroom. Intriguing:

Doc fixits and content strategy at Write the Docs Sydney on Tuesday

The next Write the Docs meetup in Sydney is just around the corner:

Sydney: Content strategy and doc fixits

Tuesday, Jul 3, 2018, 6:00 PM

Atlassian
341 George St, Sydney NSW 2000 Sydney, AU

28 Documentarians Attending

Join us to chat about docs – why they’re a Good Thing and how to make them even better. Tech writers, engineers, editors, product managers, more – if you’re interested in docs, you’re welcome. —————— Presenter 1: Michalina Ziemba **Five steps to successful content strategy** In her talk, Michalina will share examples and practical tips …

Check out this Meetup →

What’s happening

We have two presentations lined up, preceded by pizza and chatting!

  • Michalina will talk about five steps to successful content strategy.
  • I’ll follow with a presentation on doc fixits: What is a doc fixit (hint: a way of fixing doc bugs en masse), why would you want one, and what can you do with it once you have it?

Date, time, and location

Tuesday 3 July 2018, at 6pm. We aim to finish around 7.45pm.

At the Atlassian offices, 341 George St, Sydney.

Would you like to join us?

If you’re interested in technical documentation, you’re welcome! Sign up at the meetup and we’ll see you there.

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