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Where does Screeny put the recorded video or image file?

I’ve been experimenting with Screeny by Daeo Corp. Software, for recording screencasts on a Mac. It works well, but it took me ages to figure out where the app saves the movie or image files.

Here’s the answer: Screeny creates a “Screeny” directory inside your “Movies” directory, and puts the files there. They’re .mov files.

~/Movies/Screeny

​Here’s an example file name:

Screeny Video 26 Mar 2016, 5.47.45 AM.mov

​Here’s what the directory looks like in Finder:

Where Screeny puts its movie files

Screeny puts the files in that directory as soon as you stop recording. There’s no way to change the default location of the files.

​What about single screenshots? Screeny puts those into a Screeny directory in your “Pictures” directory:

~/Pictures/Screeny​

​Example file name:

Screeny Shot 26 Mar 2016, 6.09.59 AM.png​

I hope this helps you find your screencasts. 🙂

Mozilla Popcorn Maker and a tour of the Confluence documentation

Mozilla’s Popcorn Maker is pretty neat. You can grab a video and augment it with clickable text boxes. You can also add other interactive widgets, such as a live Twitter stream or a fully-functioning map from Google Maps. I’ve been playing with Popcorn Maker for a couple of weeks, and I thought other people may like to have a go. So I’ve put together a video for you to mess up… hrrm… review. It’s cunningly disguised as a tour of the Atlassian Confluence documentation. But actually, it’s a bit of fun. 😉

Popcorn Maker is all online. There’s nothing to download. You give it the URL of a video from YouTube or another supported location, then drag and drop events onto the video. The Popcorn Maker editing environment adds a timeline, a bit like the one you see in a Flash editor, but driven entirely by Javascript, HTML, and CSS. You also get a library of widgets to add and configure, such as text boxes, popups, maps, Twitter streams, and so on.

Jumping right in

Are you keen to try Popcorn Maker? Try making a remix of my Popcorn Maker movie, “Popping the Confluence docs“. I’d love it if you’d add a comment on this blog post with a link to your remix!

Mozilla Popcorn Maker and a tour of the Confluence documentation

Making the video itself

I used Screencast-O-Matic to record the movie itself. It’s a great tool too. Just like Popcorn Maker, everything is online. You do need to install Java on your computer, and it’s handy to have a webcam for the audio part of the movie. Other than that, all you need is your connection to the Internet. You can use Screencast-O-Matic free of charge, if you’re happy to have a watermark at the bottom of your movie.

Once I’d made the movie, I uploaded it to YouTube and then used Popcorn Maker to annotate it and make it available for remixing.

Some thoughts on Popcorn Maker

It’s pretty cool to be able to grab a video from YouTube (or Vimeo, Soundcloud, or an HTML 5 video) and add bits to it online, all within your web browser. Nifty technology!

But I think the huge potential lies in the fact that anyone can remix the videos. Just grab a movie that someone else has created, and decorate it yourself.

This has very interesting possibilities for collaborative development of “how to” videos. Another use that springs to mind: The review of videos. Instead of writing separate notes, people can paste their comments directly onto the relevant spot in the video. And they don’t need specialised tools to do it.

The icons and styling in general could do with some tender loving care from an artist or designer.

The integration with Twitter, Flickr and Google Maps is awesome! It makes me wonder what other integrations would be useful. Perhaps a HipChat room. Or an RSS feed from WordPress?

I’d also love to see some way of finding and sharing remixes of a given video. Ha ha, searching for “Popcorn remixes” brings up a number of song remixes!

References

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