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Analytics strategies for evaluating and planning doc updates

Over the past few months, I’ve been delving into analytics and feedback on the doc site that I currently manage. I’m crafting strategies as I go, and creating reports for product stakeholders to get their input too. I hope some of the strategies described in this post may be useful or at least interesting to other people who’re looking into how to use analytics.

Note: Although I work at Google, this post does not constitute any recommendations on the use of any Google product. I’m a technical writer, and I’m using analytics and feedback in the same way other tech writers do, to gain insights into the doc set that I manage. I am by no means an expert on analytics.

Let’s get some technical details out of the way first. The doc site under discussion is kubeflow.org, which hosts the documentation for an open source machine learning platform called Kubeflow. The documentation is also open source. The source for the docs lives on GitHub.

I’m using Google Analytics to see the doc usage stats. The Kubeflow doc site is fairly new. I enabled Google Analytics and the feedback widget on February 27, 2019, which means that the stats start from that date.

To gather user ratings on the doc pages, I’m using the feedback widget that’s available with the Docsy theme. The Kubeflow website uses Docsy and Hugo. If you’re interested in the details of the website tooling, take a look at the website README.

Goals for the analytics reports

The Kubeflow community and I are interested to see how people are using the docs. A high percentage of page views in a particular area can indicate a high level of interest in the related product features, or can point to an area of the product where people need more help than in other areas.

From a docs point of view, my goal is to identify the top priority docs for improvement, and to get some direction on the types of improvements we need to make. For example, if people are particularly interested in an area of the docs, and at the same time are not satisfied with the information they find there, then that area of the docs is high priority for improvement.

Overall site views

I started by looking at the number of website views from March (when Google Analytics became available on the site) to November (now). The number of views per month has more than doubled in that time, from 104,000+ to 220,000+. It’s good to know our reader base is increasing.

Total website views

Most-viewed pages

I looked at the pages with highest number of views across the site as a whole, and also within a few high-priority sections of the docs.

The period for these stats is two months, from September 1 – November 1. Our previous report was in July. I didn’t include August in the stats, because we did some information architecture refactoring in August. We moved many pages around. Moving pages affects the Google Analytics stats, which makes August a bad month to use for assessments in this case.

Most-viewed pages

The top entry, “/”, denotes the Kubeflow website home page: https://www.kubeflow.org/. This page consistently receives the highest number of views.

As in previous reports, the second-most viewed page is the main Getting Started guide. It’s linked from the website home page. Other getting-started guides rank highly too.

Also as in previous reports, the third-most viewed page is About Kubeflow. It’s linked from the top-level menu bar with text “What is Kubeflow”.

In a change from previous reports, the Use Cases section has replaced components and notebooks in the list of 10 most-viewed sections. I should start paying attention to this section.

Other pages in the top 10 are the same as in previous reports: the docs index page and the pipelines section.

Strategies for most-viewed sections and pages

My overall strategy for the top-viewed pages is to spend time perfecting the user experience on those pages, addressing any issues, and making sure people find the information they need:

  • Improve the textual and visual content of the most-viewed pages. For example, we recently ran a doc sprint in which we spent considerable time restructuring and rewriting the website home page, which is the most highly viewed page in the doc set. Feedback on the new design and content is good.
  • Link from the most-viewed pages to content deeper in the site, to ensure people find all the information they need. For example, we recently rewrote the “About Kubeflow” page and added links down into relevant content on the site.
  • Examine the bounce rate and time on page, to see how people are using the page.
  • Examine feedback, to see whether people are finding the content useful.

Getting feedback from readers

Every page on the Kubeflow website has a feedback option. The option asks “Was this page helpful? Yes / No”.

  • About Kubeflow received the most feedback, and 24 of 28 responses (85.7%) were positive. That’s an improvement from the July analysis, which showed 70% positive.
  • Getting Started received the second-most feedback, and 11 of 15 responses (73%) were positive. That’s exactly the same as in July.

It’s worth noting that the number of feedback responses is very low in comparison with the number of page views. Also, people are more likely to respond with negative feedback than with positive. Even so, the feedback is useful, particularly when it’s strongly positive or negative, and if the ratios of positive to negative change after we’ve updated the content.

Deep dive into specific sections and pages

Based on the above statistics and feedback results, I examined some specific pages in greater detail.

The next screenshot shows the 10 most-viewed pages within the getting-started section. We reorganized this section significantly in August. It’s useful to see which getting-started experiences are the most often viewed, in the period since that significant refactoring.

The guide to deploying Kubeflow on an existing Kubernetes cluster (roughly equivalent to on-premises installation) has most views. The workstation installation guides come next, followed by deployment to a cloud.

The following stats are for the Getting Started page, which introduces the getting-started section:

Looking at the information for this getting-started overview page in detail:

  • The page has the second-highest number of page views in the entire doc set (the top-level kubeflow.org page has highest).
  • Bounce rate* has continued dropping, from 56% in April to 44.15% in July, to 39.6 percent now. That’s a great improvement. Our goal was see it drop below 40% – goal achieved!
  • Time on page is 1 minute 7 seconds. That’s fine. There’s no need for people to spend longer on the page, because this is an overview page and the meaty content is in sub-pages.
  • The getting-started overview page has received the second-highest amount of feedback of all pages on the site , and 11 of 15 responses (73.3%) were positive. That’s exactly the same as in July.
  • Overall, the getting-started pages continue to receive low ratings.

* The bounce rate for a page is the percentage of user sessions that started and ended with that page. So, people entered the site on that page, and left without viewing any other pages. I’ve seen guidelines indicating that, as a general rule, we should avoid a bounce rate higher than 70%. If many people visit a page but leave immediately, this may indicate that the page isn’t giving them what they need, and so they leave the site. (It does depends on the type of page. The purpose of some pages is exactly to send people elsewhere.)

We need to improve the content of the getting-started section so that it better meets the readers’ expectations. One tactic I hope to follow, if I can get time from a UX research team, is to test the pages with some specific groups of users. In addition, I’ve already seen feedback from customer issues that people are looking for a single, recommended flow for getting started quickly. Currently the docs offer all the options, but don’t give much guidance on where to start.

Next up is the About Kubeflow page:

Looking at the About Kubeflow page in detail:

  • It’s the third-most highly viewed page on the website.
  • In previous reports, bounce rate came down from 63% in April to 60.4% in July. Bounce rate has now gone up again to 62%. We need to lower the bounce rate, as this page is a highly-viewed page and we want to draw people deeper into the site. I’m working on a new Kubeflow overview (pull request #1339). When that new page is available, I’ll link to it from the About Kubeflow page, and then re-assess the bounce rate.
  • Average time on page is two minutes. That’s good for an overview page. People are engaged in the content.
  • The page has received the most feedback of all pages on the site, and 24 of 28 responses (85.7%) were positive. That’s an improvement on July (70% positive).
    We refactored the page in June to provide more information and links. I hope to improve the positivity still further by linking to the new Kubeflow overview mentioned above.

What about the Use Cases section, which has recently made it into the top 10 most highly viewed sections?

  • It’s interesting to see a set of guides arrive in the top 10 most highly-viewed pages for the first time. This change potentially indicates that our audience is maturing and looking for more in-depth use-case focused docs. The product (Kubeflow) is relatively new, and is currently working towards a v1.0 launch in 2020. Up now, perhaps most people have been focused on getting the product up and running and trying the simple use cases provided in the getting-started section. Now maybe they need more in-depth use cases.
  • The feedback ratings on this section are low. We need to make sure people get what they’re looking for.
  • One action I’m considering is to adjust the information architecture to reflect what people are probably looking for. At least in the short term, I could rename the section, as it describes highly specific ways of using the product, rather than the more generic use case information that people may be looking for. Alternatively, I could move the content into another section, such as the “further setup and trouble shooting” section.
  • Then, when we have more bandwidth and have had time to do more research, we should flesh out the section with more use cases. We do already have some good examples and tutorials, which we can include in this section.

Open source contributors to the docs

Moving from Google Analytics to GitHub stats for the doc repository, it’s interesting to see the fluctuation in the number of contributors to the docs. It’s not just me writing the docs!

The following events influenced the contributor numbers:

  • We ran a community-wide Kubeflow doc sprint in July. Contributions increased significantly during that period, and stayed high for a while afterwards.
  • Contributions picked up towards the Kubeflow v0.7 release, which happened in early November.
  • In mid November, we ran a doc fixit for external tech writers at the Write the Docs conference in Australia. That fixit causes the large spike at the right-hand edge of the graph.

We need to run more doc sprints and fixits!

Traffic sources

A product stakeholder requested information about the sources of website traffic. I haven’t yet figured out any related strategies.

In the period August 1 – November 1, 2019, close to 60% of the website traffic came from organic search. Referrals accounted for 22%.

Traffic sources

I looked at the referrals, and found that the largest percentage (29%) of referrals come from GitHub. This is not surprising, given that the source code for the product is also on GitHub. The next-largest percentage is 8.5%, coming from a related doc site.

The top 10 search terms are primarily variations of the product name, “Kubeflow”, with one outlier: “minikf” at number 4. MiniKF is a deployment tool for Kubeflow.

Search terms

More analytics tips?

If you have any analytics tips or experiences to share, I’d love to hear them. Links are welcome!

What languages do our readers speak – from Google Analytics

I’ve grabbed some Google Analytics statistics about the languages used by visitors to the Atlassian documentation wiki. The information is based on the language setting in people’s browsers. It’s a pretty cool way of judging whether we need to translate our documentation!

The statistics cover a period of 3 months, from 7 September to 7 December 2012.

Summary

Approximately 30% of our readers speak a language other than English. The most popular non-English language is German (approximately 7%), followed by French (approx 2.6%). Japanese is hard to quantify, because we have separate sites for Japanese content.

The pretty picture

This graph shows the results for the top 10 locales:

Top 10 locales via Google Analytics

Top 10 locales via Google Analytics

The grey sector represents a number of smaller segments, each one below 1%. In Google Analytics, I can see them by requesting more than 10 lines of data.

The figures

Here are the figures that back the above graph:

Locale Number of visits Percentage of total
1. en-us 1,951,818 66.75%
2. en-gb 163,897 5.60%
3. de 105,526 3.61%
4. de-de 102,578 3.51%
5. fr 77,666 2.66%
6. ru 66,342 2.27%
7. zh-cn 38,850 1.33%
8. en 38,826 1.33%
9. es 37,129 1.27%
10. pl 30,064 1.03%

More Google Analytics?

Google Analytics is a useful tool. If you’re interested in a couple more posts about it, try the Google Analytics tag on this blog. I hope the posts are interesting. 🙂

Top 100 pages in the Confluence documentation

This week I took a look at the top 100 pages in the Confluence documentation, as reported by Google Analytics on our documentation wiki. Google Analytics data is nice-looking as well as interesting, and I thought you’d like to see the results too. So here goes.

The analysis covers the pages in the documentation space for the latest version of Confluence only – the “DOC” space on our documentation site. The analysis does not include the documentation for any other products on the site (such as JIRA or Bitbucket) and it does not include earlier versions of the Confluence documentation either.

I chose to do the analysis over a period of two months: 16 August to 16 October 2012. In the middle of that period was the release of Confluence 4.3, on 4 September. As the spike in the graph shows, something happened on 3 October too!

Inferences drawn from the Google Analytics results

I’ve drawn some conclusions which will help me in restructuring the documentation space and prioritising work on the documentation:

  1. Information about specific, complex topics tops the bill:
    • JAVA_HOME variable (at position 1, this is the most popular page. It’s likely that many readers are not even looking for information about Confluence specifically.)
    • Wiki markup (position 4)
    • Working with tables (9)
    • Integrating JIRA and Confluence (10)
    • etc
  2. Installation and upgrade come next:
    • Upgrading Confluence (5)
    • Installation Guide (8)
  3. Release notes are popular:
    • Confluence 4.3 release notes (7)
  4. “Getting started” information is popular:
    • Confluence User’s Guide (6)
    • Confluence 101 (23)
    • Getting Started with Confluence (24)
    • Dashboard (43)
    • About Confluence (54)
  5. Both “Confluence 101” and “Getting Started with Confluence” are popular. It may benefit customers to merge these two documents. Both need a refresh. We need to better define purpose and audience of each.
  6. Something big happened on 3 October – possibly the launch of a “collaboration” campaign by our marketing team, heralded by this blog post: Collaboration Best Practices – 3 Reasons Interruptions Hurt Your Team’s Productivity.

The pretty picture

Google Analytics results in the DOC space

Summary of statistics for the whole space

Page Views Unique Page Views Avg. Time on Page Entrances Bounce Rate % Exit

807,430

% of Total:

15.52%

(5,202,109)

663,691

% of Total:

15.53%

(4,273,708)

00:02:25

Site Avg:

00:02:13

(8.54%)

328,588

% of Total:

17.36%

(1,892,574)

58.70%

Site Avg:

55.64%

(5.50%)

39.60%

Site Avg:

36.38%

(8.84%)

Detailed statistics for the top 100 pages

Due to problems with the fixed width theme of this blog, I’ve split the table in two. First the list of top 100 pages:

1.
/display/DOC/Setting+the+JAVA_HOME+Variable+in+Windows
2.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Documentation+Home
3.
/display/DOC/helptips/header/iframe
4.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Wiki+Markup
5.
/display/DOC/Upgrading+Confluence
6.
/display/DOC/Confluence+User’s+Guide
7.
/display/DOC/Confluence+4.3+Release+Notes
8.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Installation+Guide
9.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Tables
10.
/display/DOC/Integrating+JIRA+and+Confluence
11.
/display/DOC/Installing+Confluence+on+Linux
12.
/display/DOC/Code+Block+Macro
13.
/display/DOC/Adding+a+Template
14.
/display/DOC/JIRA+Issues+Macro
15.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Anchors
16.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Macros
17.
/display/DOC/System+Requirements
18.
/display/DOC/Using+Apache+with+mod_proxy
19.
/display/DOC/Supported+Platforms
20.
/display/DOC/Connecting+to+an+LDAP+Directory
21.
/display/DOC/Importing+Content+Into+Confluence
22.
/display/DOC/Using+Apache+with+virtual+hosts+and+mod_proxy
23.
/display/DOC/Confluence+101
24.
/display/DOC/Getting+Started+with+Confluence
25.
/display/DOC/Server+Hardware+Requirements+Guide
26.
/display/DOC/Table+of+Contents+Macro
27.
/display/DOC/Page+Restrictions
28.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Setup+Guide
29.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Administrator’s+Guide
30.
/display/DOC/Database+Setup+For+MySQL
31.
/display/DOC/Customising+Exports+to+PDF
32.
/display/DOC/Configuring+the+Server+Base+URL
33.
/display/DOC/Running+Confluence+Over+SSL+or+HTTPS
34.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Links
35.
/display/DOC/Migrating+Confluence+Between+Servers
36.
/display/DOC/Installing+Confluence
37.
/display/DOC/Adding+Pages
38.
/display/DOC/Installing+Confluence+and+JIRA+Together
39.
/display/DOC/Restoring+Passwords+To+Recover+Admin+User+Rights
40.
/display/DOC/Confluence+4.3.1+Release+Notes
41.
/display/DOC/Setting+Up+Trusted+Communication+between+JIRA+and+Confluence
42.
/display/DOC/Installing+Confluence+on+Windows
43.
/display/DOC/Dashboard
44.
/display/DOC/Creating+Content
45.
/display/DOC/View+File+Macro
46.
/display/DOC/Space+Permissions+Overview
47.
/display/DOC/Writing+User+Macros
48.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Spaces
49.
/display/DOC/Keyboard+Shortcuts
50.
/display/DOC/Configuring+the+Documentation+Theme
51.
/display/DOC/Page+Tree+Macro
52.
/display/DOC/Creating+a+Page+using+a+Template
53.
/display/DOC/Assigning+Space+Permissions
54.
/display/DOC/About+Confluence
55.
/display/DOC/Customising+the+Dashboard
56.
/display/DOC/Confluence+4.3+Upgrade+Notes
57.
/display/DOC/Tasklist+Macro
58.
/display/DOC/Exporting+Confluence+Pages+and+Spaces+to+PDF
59.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Page+Layouts+and+Columns+and+Sections
60.
/display/DOC/Database+Configuration
61.
/display/DOC/Confluence+4.2+Release+Notes
62.
/display/DOC/Styling+Confluence+with+CSS
63.
/display/DOC/Moving+a+Page
64.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Security+Advisory+2012-09-11
65.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Wiki+Markup+for+Macros
66.
/display/DOCSPRINT/The+Simplest+Possible+JIRA+REST+Examples
67.
/display/DOC/Inserting+JIRA+Issues
68.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Installation+and+Upgrade+Guide
69.
/display/DOC/Running+Confluence+behind+Apache
70.
/display/DOC/Quick+Reference+Guide+for+the+Confluence+Editor
71.
/display/DOC/Migrate+to+Another+Database
72.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Templates
73.
/display/DOC/Confluence+4+Editor+-+What’s+Changed+for+Wiki+Markup+Users
74.
/display/DOC/Confluence+Release+Notes
75.
/display/DOC/Configuring+Tomcat’s+URI+encoding
76.
/display/DOC/Installing+the+Confluence+EAR-WAR+Edition
77.
/display/DOC/Using+the+Editor
78.
/display/DOC/Installing+Confluence+on+Linux+from+Archive+File
79.
/display/DOC/Upgrading+Confluence+Manually
80.
/display/DOC/Confluence+4.2.13+Release+Notes
81.
/display/DOC/Linking+to+Pages
82.
/display/DOC/Adding+a+Navigation+Sidebar
83.
/display/DOC/Chart+Macro
84.
/display/DOC/Installing+the+Firefox+Add-On+for+the+Office+Connector
85.
/display/DOC/Include+Page+Macro
86.
/display/DOC/Configuring+a+MySQL+Datasource+in+Apache+Tomcat
87.
/display/DOC/Configuring+a+WebDAV+client+for+Confluence
88.
/display/DOC/Working+with+Templates+Overview
89.
/display/DOC/HTML+Macro
90.
/display/DOC/Deleting+a+Page
91.
/display/DOC/Examples+of+User+Macros
92.
/display/DOC/Database+Setup+for+SQL+Server
93.
/display/DOC/Connecting+to+an+Internal+Directory+with+LDAP+Authentication
94.
/display/DOC/Configuring+Database+Character+Encoding
95.
/display/DOC/Expand+Macro
96.
/display/DOC/Global+Permissions+Overview
97.
/display/DOC/Widget+Connector+Macro
98.
/display/DOC/Subscribing+to+Email+Notifications+of+Updates+to+Confluence+Content
99.
/display/DOC/Column+Macro
100.
/display/DOC/Panel+Macro
Page

And now the figures for each page:

1. 37,312 34,826 00:05:46 34,025 91.66% 90.44%
2. 35,926 28,186 00:01:04 13,313 27.89% 19.12%
3. 21,708 666 00:00:12 651 52.38% 2.99%
4. 14,408 12,707 00:03:29 9,039 64.55% 57.54%
5. 10,061 7,967 00:03:38 4,004 45.65% 38.32%
6. 10,050 7,851 00:01:03 3,756 34.42% 22.32%
7. 9,400 7,303 00:02:55 4,346 49.08% 39.49%
8. 8,669 6,616 00:01:12 3,976 16.55% 13.85%
9. 7,950 6,800 00:03:31 4,909 64.25% 56.29%
10. 7,497 6,326 00:02:26 4,274 43.54% 36.40%
11. 6,761 5,346 00:03:46 1,276 52.59% 32.89%
12. 5,619 5,056 00:02:56 4,070 72.85% 66.90%
13. 5,542 4,558 00:03:40 2,454 52.20% 42.69%
14. 5,475 4,601 00:04:13 2,706 60.31% 50.52%
15. 5,305 4,685 00:04:22 3,463 70.81% 62.09%
16. 5,165 4,196 00:02:06 2,070 42.95% 30.71%
17. 5,107 3,837 00:01:39 888 28.04% 16.41%
18. 5,064 4,364 00:06:31 2,866 80.98% 68.58%
19. 4,898 4,035 00:02:51 1,004 55.48% 34.24%
20. 4,895 4,260 00:04:19 2,552 72.84% 58.18%
21. 4,823 3,881 00:01:40 2,316 37.52% 30.81%
22. 4,201 3,767 00:04:44 3,119 78.94% 71.13%
23. 4,136 3,469 00:01:53 647 52.24% 27.95%
24. 4,108 2,858 00:00:48 371 25.88% 10.20%
25. 4,016 3,583 00:03:13 2,121 78.22% 56.55%
26. 3,892 3,400 00:03:29 2,503 63.88% 54.47%
27. 3,875 3,368 00:03:00 2,274 57.87% 49.83%
28. 3,782 3,258 00:04:03 1,238 45.80% 37.31%
29. 3,754 2,908 00:01:08 717 33.05% 15.64%
30. 3,714 3,151 00:06:22 1,487 69.20% 53.26%
31. 3,691 3,043 00:04:08 1,625 70.15% 53.13%
32. 3,462 3,085 00:04:18 1,580 67.78% 54.02%
33. 3,451 2,999 00:05:21 1,904 67.59% 58.39%
34. 3,397 2,946 00:01:53 1,707 53.19% 39.45%
35. 3,390 2,922 00:04:35 1,496 52.67% 44.54%
36. 3,359 2,695 00:00:32 125 18.40% 4.91%
37. 3,317 2,738 00:02:09 385 51.69% 24.60%
38. 3,305 2,530 00:02:08 1,058 30.53% 20.85%
39. 3,299 2,923 00:05:48 1,990 69.05% 58.23%
40. 3,224 2,628 00:02:52 1,181 45.39% 36.79%
41. 3,131 2,514 00:03:09 1,064 43.33% 31.56%
42. 3,129 2,542 00:03:48 401 43.64% 29.34%
43. 3,123 2,640 00:02:31 681 46.26% 25.68%
44. 3,055 2,414 00:01:03 501 23.95% 12.54%
45. 3,047 2,575 00:03:23 1,608 63.06% 54.78%
46. 3,040 2,635 00:02:29 1,006 42.84% 36.64%
47. 3,020 2,550 00:03:24 1,253 53.95% 39.93%
48. 2,968 2,479 00:02:04 716 46.65% 25.40%
49. 2,963 2,721 00:03:12 1,969 74.25% 61.80%
50. 2,913 2,532 00:04:15 1,054 62.24% 49.40%
51. 2,901 2,322 00:03:13 1,131 54.11% 41.57%
52. 2,850 2,490 00:02:16 1,266 42.02% 33.26%
53. 2,797 2,457 00:03:16 1,133 60.72% 51.41%
54. 2,795 2,359 00:01:41 189 41.27% 21.97%
55. 2,782 2,230 00:02:51 1,337 47.87% 38.43%
56. 2,757 2,110 00:02:18 597 24.79% 21.11%
57. 2,749 2,354 00:03:14 1,665 55.98% 50.35%
58. 2,677 2,354 00:02:59 1,613 58.09% 50.84%
59. 2,646 2,347 00:03:24 773 69.47% 44.07%
60. 2,645 1,866 00:00:53 672 20.83% 11.83%
61. 2,602 2,110 00:01:58 999 35.34% 27.59%
62. 2,599 2,081 00:02:45 1,370 50.07% 40.28%
63. 2,574 2,257 00:03:32 1,148 65.16% 55.67%
64. 2,570 2,128 00:04:06 634 69.87% 64.67%
65. 2,559 2,217 00:03:12 491 54.18% 43.34%
66. 2,555 2,121 00:05:54 1,828 70.30% 65.75%
67. 2,480 2,155 00:02:52 763 46.92% 35.69%
68. 2,473 2,007 00:00:38 242 10.74% 5.30%
69. 2,442 1,906 00:01:41 875 36.23% 21.66%
70. 2,440 2,136 00:02:42 969 55.52% 41.27%
71. 2,435 1,939 00:02:58 911 54.12% 35.44%
72. 2,420 2,056 00:01:23 589 37.18% 26.03%
73. 2,413 2,188 00:03:26 1,242 67.95% 59.64%
74. 2,411 1,807 00:00:59 394 30.96% 15.93%
75. 2,350 2,189 00:04:59 1,955 90.90% 83.57%
76. 2,319 1,744 00:04:16 593 50.93% 34.54%
77. 2,315 1,897 00:01:58 512 38.28% 24.28%
78. 2,312 1,814 00:04:42 365 50.68% 32.74%
79. 2,311 1,905 00:03:26 524 50.00% 34.62%
80. 2,304 1,827 00:01:31 709 37.24% 29.12%
81. 2,304 2,002 00:03:06 834 61.63% 44.97%
82. 2,297 1,968 00:02:55 1,307 52.49% 46.02%
83. 2,267 1,953 00:04:31 1,343 67.76% 58.49%
84. 2,232 1,653 00:03:25 1,135 67.75% 53.45%
85. 2,221 1,930 00:02:55 1,065 50.89% 41.11%
86. 2,186 1,990 00:05:58 1,719 84.53% 76.12%
87. 2,184 1,733 00:04:31 1,258 70.99% 60.07%
88. 2,167 1,926 00:01:41 1,613 52.45% 48.18%
89. 2,164 1,786 00:02:26 1,018 52.65% 42.05%
90. 2,132 1,953 00:02:49 1,514 69.82% 62.66%
91. 2,103 1,242 00:00:52 367 26.43% 10.98%
92. 2,033 1,598 00:03:32 638 60.19% 42.15%
93. 2,030 1,850 00:03:33 1,189 75.19% 61.87%
94. 2,013 1,842 00:06:00 1,253 88.35% 71.39%
95. 2,000 1,704 00:05:28 1,213 32.65% 56.35%
96. 1,991 1,777 00:03:01 669 59.19% 41.64%
97. 1,989 1,560 00:03:52 710 66.48% 52.89%
98. 1,953 1,736 00:02:58 1,079 67.19% 53.51%
99. 1,943 1,701 00:02:05 868 47.24% 37.42%
100. 1,942 1,691 00:03:28 941 58.24% 46.76%
Page Views Unique Page Views Avg. Time on Page Entrances Bounce Rate % Exit

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

A while ago Susan Grodsky dropped a comment on my blog, asking me to write something about Atlassian’s experiences in allowing users to comment publicly on our documentation. I’ve been gathering some information for such a post. But first, I thought, it would be useful to know a bit about the traffic that our documentation wiki receives. So here we go.

I’ve been delving into Google Analytics to gather some stats about the number of visitors to our documentation. In a follow-up post, I’ll take a look at the comments people have posted on the documentation pages in the same period of time.

A bit about our documentation wiki

We write and publish all our documentation on a single Confluence site: confluence.atlassian.com, fondly known as CAC. It hosts the documentation for all our products: JIRA, Confluence, Crowd, FishEye, Crucible, Bamboo, JIRA Studio and more.

Each product has its own documentation “space”. Most products in fact have a number of spaces, one for each major release of the product. If you go to the wiki dashboard and scroll down, you’ll see the list of spaces on the left-hand side of the screen.

And yes, the documentation for the Confluence product is hosted on Confluence itself. 🙂 So, the Confluence documentation space is just one of the spaces on the documentation wiki at confluence.atlassian.com.

I’ll give some stats for the wiki as a whole. Then we’ll look at one single space, the documentation for the Confluence product itself.

Below: Stats for the entire wiki over 6 months, from 14 July 2010 to 14 January 2011

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

6 months from 14 July 2010 to 14 January 2011

  • Number of visits: 3 308 866
  • Number of page views: 11 037 412
  • Number of visitors: 1 798 667 (not shown on the screenshot)

Below: Stats for the entire wiki over 1 week, from 7 to 14 January 2011

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

  • Number of visits: 157 312
  • Number of page views: 540 488
  • Number of visitors: 99 329

Below: Top content across the entire wiki over 1 week, from 7 to 14 January 2011

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

Below: Traffic sources for the entire wiki over 1 week, from 7 to 14 January 2011

Google Analytics stats for the Atlassian documentation wiki

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

  • Direct traffic: 22.7%
  • Referring sites: 23.56%
  • Search engines: 53.04% (mostly Google)

Traffic sent from ffeathers to the Atlassian docs

Curiosity grabbed hold here: I wondered how much traffic my own blog had sent to our documentation wiki. So I had a look…

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

The above screenshot shows that ffeathers triggered 1 356 visits to the documentation wiki over 6 months. And over a week:

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

It seems that ffeathers accounted for 0.06% of the visits to the documentation site. Peanuts, maybe, but still interesting. 🙂

Below: More about the visitors to the wiki over 1 week, from 7 to 14 January 2011

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

  • Number of visits: 157 312
  • Number of unique visitors: 99 329
  • Number of page views: 540 488
  • Most popular browser by far: Firefox

Below: Stats for the documentation for a single product, Confluence, over 1 week, from 7 to 14 January 2011

Let’s take a look at just one space in the wiki: the “DOC” space, containing the documentation for Confluence.

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

Google Analytics stats from the Atlassian documentation wiki

  • Number of pages viewed during that week: 1 793
  • Number of page views: 99 310
  • Number of unique page views: 78 037
  • Average time on page: 2 and a half minutes
  • Bounce rate: 52.92% (these are people who just read the one page they landed on, and then left without going elsewhere on the site)

Wrapping up for now

Google Analytics is pretty cool. As you can see from the screenshots, there’s a lot to learn from the information it gives. I hope you’ve enjoyed this brief glimpse into GA and into the number of hits our documentation wiki receives. In my next post, I’ll take a look at the comments we get on the Confluence documentation space (DOC) in particular.

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