Blog Archives

Publishing a book online in serial form

I’ve recently published a fiction book, first in serial form on my own website, then as an entire book on Amazon.com. Publishing the book in serial form, chapter by chapter, was an interesting experience. It was an experiment. I wanted to see the pros and cons from an author’s point of view and from a reader’s point of view.

The book is A Word If You Please, featuring Trilby Trench and a collection of friends and foes. Trilby Trench is a technical writer who likes a bit of action. As Trilby’s friends know, adventure stalks Trilby and she stalks it right back. The serialised book is online on the Trilby Trench site (free of charge). You can also download the book from Amazon.com as a Kindle ebook (USD $3.11) and a paperback (USD $6.99).

Why serialise a book?

I’d been wondering about publishing in serial form for a while. What would it be like for me as author and for the people reading my book?

For example, would publishing the book in serial form be a good way of getting feedback from readers? In my case, the answer is yes. More people have sent me comments about this book than about the other fiction books I’ve published. The comments come in on Facebook, the Trilby Trench site, and other social media.

For an author, publishing a book chapter by chapter can be a challenge. Once you’ve published a chapter, you can’t go back and change it. That’d be breaking an unwritten contract with your readers. Actually, it’s a written contract, kind of! So, if your plot goes awry or you forgot to include something in an earlier chapter, you have to work around that. Before publishing the first chapter, you need a very good plan for the entire book. I like to have it mostly written, though not necessarily polished and complete.

This way of publishing made me think a lot about my readers.

What do readers think of the experience? Some may find it fun to have to wait for the next instalment. The suspense may increase their interest in the book. Others may find it annoying to have a break artificially imposed on them, or may lose the thread of the story. Perhaps a serialised book would stick in people’s memories longer than if they’d read it all in one go. Perhaps some people simply wait until all the chapters are available!

Where to publish a book in serial form?

I took a look at a few options for where and how to publish the book online.

Wattpad is an online community for readers and writers. If you publish your work there, you have a ready audience and a medium that’s well designed to bring authors and readers together. I wasn’t too sure that the primary Wattpad audience was right for my book. The most popular genres there are science fiction, young adult, and fantasy, and my book doesn’t fit into those categories. Also, Wattpad keeps popping up requests to log in, even if you’re a reader and not an author. I think that’s a barrier to entry for readers.

I also like the look of Inkitt. It has a clean UI, and it focuses on readers rather than authors.

After careful consideration, I decided to publish the book on my own blog or site, so that I could have more control.

One option was to publish the book on this blog (ffeathers.wordpress.com, where you’re reading this post). One the one hand, the focus of this blog is fiction as well as technical writing, so it’d be a good place for the book. On the other hand, this blog is primarily a blog, whereas I wanted a site that focused on the book rather than the blog posts. So, I needed a different layout, and I didn’t want to mess with ffeathers.

After weighing up the options, I decided to create a new website for the book. In fact, the website is for the character, Trilby Trench, as I plan to publish more than one book with Trilby as hero. Hence the site name and URL, trilbytrench.com. The site runs on WordPress, hosted by Bluehost. I’m using the Author theme, with some CSS tweaks to change font sizes (the default size was too small) and colours.

What do you think about serialised fiction?

If you have any comments from your experience as a reader of serial fiction, either my book or others, I’m keen to know what you think. What are the pros and cons of reading serialised fiction? Comments from authors would be interesting too!

Advertisements

Trilby Trench book now Kindle and paperback

The first book of my new Trilby Trench series is now available on Amazon.com as a Kindle ebook and in paperback form. Trilby Trench is an action hero who also happens to be a technical writer. She’s deft with words, analytic in thought, and skilled in everything that she’s written about. That covers a lot of ground. Things happen to Trilby, and she happens right back at them.

The book title is A Word If You Please. You can get it here:

I first published A Word If You Please in serial form, chapter by chapter, on the Trilby Trench site. Last week I went through the very interesting process of publishing the book with Kindle Direct Publishing, both as a Kindle book and in paperback.

If you order quickly, you just may see the paperback before I do. 🙂 I’ve ordered one, but it hasn’t arrived yet. It has to make its way from the US all the way to Australia. So I have no idea what it looks like in real life, or what it feels like to hold.

Review, anyone?

If you’ve read the book and are happy to put a review on Amazon, that’d be awesome!

Chapter 2 of the adventures of Trilby Trench

Have things improved, or is Trilby Trench still in a pickle? Read A Word If You Please, chapter 2 to find out!

A Word If You Please is the first book in an online fiction series about Trilby Trench, tech writer and action hero. Don’t worry if you missed chapter 1 – you can still read it and get to know Trilby Trench. See the about page on her site. You can also subscribe to updates on the site, to make sure you don’t miss out again. 🙂

Announcing Trilby Trench, tech writer and adventurer

Let me introduce you to Trilby Trench, technical writer.

In her own words:

I’m Trilby Trench.
As in the hat, the coat.

The role of a technical writer is more exciting than you’d think. Sometimes things get physical. Trilby has always been lucky in a fight. Or perhaps it’s skill rather than luck. As every technical writer knows, you need to do something yourself before you can write the manual. Trilby has written a variety of manuals.

The first account of the Trilby Trench adventures is out! Try A Word If You Please.

If you like, you can subscribe to the Trilby Trench site, to receive an email when the next chapter is available. I’d love to know what you think about Trilby Trench and her friends. Share your thoughts by commenting on the Trilby Trench blog or here on this blog.  I’ll be adding chapters regularly, and working on the site’s appearance.

Novels and fascinating theories

A while ago, I stumbled across M Vera Bührmann’s book, Living in Two Worlds, and found it fascinating. My novel, Things Unseen, grew around the ideas in Dr Bührmann’s book. I wonder how often that happens: an interesting theory in psychology, or archaeology, or another discipline, opens the bud of a romantic novel or wakes the sleeping beast of a horror story.

Dr Bührmann spent a number of years working with African healers amongst the Xhosa people in South Africa, exploring the ways in which the healers look after the health of their community. These healers are often called “witch doctors”, and their powers are sometimes referred to as “magic”. Here’s what Dr Bührmann has to say:

My aim therefore is to show that much of what is called “magic” in the healing systems of the amagqira [the Xhosa word for healers] is not “magical” in the usual sense of the word but is based on sound principles of depth psychology, especially as formulated by Carl Gustav Jung and his followers. The amagqira have not thought out and systematised their methods as is customary in the Western, scientific world. They have, rather, perceived their methods intuitively, and use them in, to us, non-rational ways.

… The “two worlds” I am concerned with are the Western world which is primarily scientific, rational and ego-oriented, and the world of the Black healer and his people, which is primarily intuitive, non-rational or orientated towards the inner world of symbols and images of the collective unconscious.” [Living in Two Worlds, published by Human & Rousseau, 1984, pages 14-15.]

Xhosa traditional healers believe that our ancestors communicate with us via dreams. The word “ancestor” has a special meaning to a Xhosa person. An ancestor is a presence in your mind and in your family, who plays a very definite and beneficial role in guiding your actions and guarding you and your people.

Jungian healers believe that our unconscious communicates with our conscious minds via symbols in dreams.

I’ve billed my novel, Things Unseen, as “a combination of sizzling romance, eerie horror, and tense psychological drama”. It’s a love story. It’s also a story of African and European cultures meeting, competing, and merging to produce something new. It’s the result of careful study of African culture, language and stories. It plays with symbols from both African and European cultures.

In her book, Dr Bührmann describes the similarities between the treatment methods and philosophies of African witchdoctors and Jungian psychologists. My novel weaves a story around this theme.

An interplay between story and theory: I’d guess this is fairly common in science fiction. In fact, the inspiration travels in both directions there. How about other types of fiction – have you seen the sleeping beauty of a story awakened by an interesting theory?

Things Unseen

%d bloggers like this: