Category Archives: tech comm on a map

Now you can add items to Tech Comm on a Map yourself

A smart colleague showed me how to tweak the data source for Tech Comm on a Map so that I can allow data entry via a form, and moderate each entry before it appears on the map. This means technical writers around the world can add items to the map directly, instead of  asking me to do it via a comment on this blog. Too cool!

Would you like to add a conference, society, group, business, or educational course to the map, or some other titbit that technical writers will find interesting?

Use this online form to add an item to the map.

Any items you add will be saved for moderation, and will appear on the map once they’ve passed review.

Background info

Tech Comm on a Map puts technical communication titbits onto an interactive map, together with the data and functionality provided by Google Maps. Read more about Tech Comm on a Map or see it in action.

Tech Comm on a Map

Educational programs and courses now in Tech Comm on a Map

Tech Comm on a Map now has a category for educational programs and courses, such as university technical communication degrees or certificates and other training courses. Take a look and let me know if you have something to add.

Tech Comm on a Map puts technical communication titbits onto an interactive map, together with the data and functionality provided by Google Maps. It’s a great way of seeing what we tech writers are up to, around the world. To find out more about the project, or to add something to the map, check out the project information page.

Screen Shot 2015-01-02 at 3.23.10 pm

Tech comm 2015 now on the map

Tech Comm on a Map now displays all the 2015 technical communication conferences that I’ve found so far. Take a look, and let me know if there are any more tech comm conferences, groups, businesses or societies to add.

Tech Comm on a Map puts technical communication titbits onto an interactive map, together with the data and functionality provided by Google Maps. It’s a great way of seeing what we tech writers are up to, around the world. To find out more about the project, or to add something to the map, check out the project information page.

Tech Comm on a Map 2015

How to build a map using a spreadsheet and JavaScript

This week I published a post on the Google Geo Developers Blog describing the building blocks of Tech Comm on a Map. That post assumes some knowledge of the Google Maps JavaScript API, so I’ve decided to write a top-up post with a little more detail.

Tech Comm on a Map puts technical communication titbits (societies, groups, businesses and conferences) onto an interactive map, together with the data and functionality provided by Google Maps. You can grab a copy of the code from GitHub. The most relevant bits are the HTML that defines the web page (index.html) and the JavaScript that defines and interacts with the map.

Loading the Google Maps JavaScript API

The first thing is to get hold of a map via the Google Maps JavaScript API. An HTML element imports the Google Maps JavaScript API library into the web page:

<script type="text/javascript"
  src="https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/js?key=YOUR-API-KEY&libraries=places">

Now all the functions of the Google Maps JavaScript API are available to the web page, and I can call them from my own JavaScript. With just a few lines of code I get an interactive Google map, loaded with geographical data and offering the default set of user functionality: zoom, pan, the choice of map view or satellite view, and Street View. To get started, see the Google Maps JavaScript API documentation.

You may have noticed the libraries parameter in the above <script> element:

&libraries=places

I’ve added that parameter to request the Places library, which I use for the search box on the map as described later in this post.

Putting the map into the HTML page

The HTML file contains a <div> element, with an ID, to define a place to put the map. In this case, I’ve called it “map-canvas”.

<div id="map-canvas">

Now the JavaScript can refer to that <div> when inserting the map onto the page. In essence, the JavaScript consists of two sections:

  • A function, here called “initializeMap()”, that sets up the map options and then adds the map to the page.
  • A listener that waits until the page has finished loading, then adds the map by calling the “initializeMap()” function.

Below is part of the “initializeMap()” function. It creates the map object, google.maps.Map, passing it the <div> element that will contain the map, and a number of parameters that define the map centre, zoom factor, and other options:

function initializeMap() {
  map = new google.maps.Map(document.getElementById("map-canvas"), {
    center: {lat: 35.55, lng: 16.50},
    zoom: DEFAULT_ZOOM,
    panControl: false,
    streetViewControl: true,
    streetViewControlOptions: {
      position: google.maps.ControlPosition.LEFT_BOTTOM
    },
    zoomControl: true,
    zoomControlOptions: {
      position: google.maps.ControlPosition.LEFT_BOTTOM
    }
  });
}

And this is the listener that calls the function to load the map:

google.maps.event.addDomListener(window, 'load', initializeMap);
Great, now we have a map, and I can start adding the bits and pieces that make up Tech Comm on a Map.

Visualising tech comm data on the map

Tech Comm on a Map contains information of the following types, all related to technical writing and technical communication:

  • Conferences (purple circles).
  • Societies (yellow circles), which includes societies and associations.
  • Groups (pink circles) for smaller groups and regular meet-ups of technical communicators, either as part of a larger society/association, or as an independent group.
  • Businesses  (green circles) for commercial organisations specialising in tech comm, such as consultancies, recruiters, publishers, independent technical writers, and so on.
  • Other (blue circles), a grab bag to catch anything that doesn’t fit into the above categories.

The data is held in a Google Docs spreadsheet. Any changes we make in the spreadsheet are immediately reflected on the map. For details on setting up such a spreadsheet, and pulling the information into the map, see my post on the Google Geo Developers Blog.

The Place Autocomplete search box

The last piece of the puzzle is to let users search for a specific location on the map, so that they can zoom in and see the events in that location. The location search box on the map is provided by the Place Autocomplete widget from the Google Places API.
The HTML defines an input field for the search box:
<input id="place-search" type="text"
  placeholder="Search for a location">
The JavaScript adds the search box to the page, and creates a listener to react when the user starts typing in the search box:
var input = /** @type {HTMLInputElement} */(
    document.getElementById('place-search'));

var types = document.getElementById('type-selector');
var branding = document.getElementById('branding');
map.controls[google.maps.ControlPosition.TOP_LEFT].push(branding);
map.controls[google.maps.ControlPosition.LEFT_TOP].push(types);
map.controls[google.maps.ControlPosition.TOP_LEFT].push(input);

var autocomplete = new google.maps.places.Autocomplete(input);

// When the user searches for & selects a place, zoom in & add a marker.
var searchMarker = new google.maps.Marker({
  map: map,
  visible: false,
});

autocomplete.addListener('place_changed', function() {
  searchMarker.setVisible(false);
  var place = autocomplete.getPlace();
  if (!place.geometry) {
    return;
  }

  // If the place has a geometry, then show it on the map.
  if (place.geometry.viewport) {
    map.fitBounds(place.geometry.viewport);
  } else {
    map.setCenter(place.geometry.location);
    map.setZoom(AUTO_ZOOM);
  }
  searchMarker.setIcon(/** @type {google.maps.Icon} */({
    url: place.icon,
    size: new google.maps.Size(71, 71),
    origin: new google.maps.Point(0, 0),
    anchor: new google.maps.Point(17, 34),
    scaledSize: new google.maps.Size(35, 35)
  }));
  searchMarker.setPosition(place.geometry.location);
  searchMarker.setVisible(true);
});

What’s next?

Thanks to everyone who has contributed to this project. We’ll continue adding data items to the spreadsheet. We technical communicators are putting ourselves on the map!

As far as the code is concerned, there are already a few ideas for new features:

  • Add marker clustering, so that it’s easier to read the map when there’s a large number of items in a small area.
  • Make it possible to share a link to a particular item on the map, for example by creating and storing a hash fragment in the URL.
  • Add a data type for training/courses.

Would you like to contribute? The code is on GitHub.

Tech Comm on a Map now includes businesses and groups

A month ago I announced my project called “Tech Comm on a Map”. The idea is to help us see what’s happening in the world of technical communication around the globeTech Comm on a Map puts tech comm titbits onto an interactive map, together with the data and functionality provided by Google Maps.

When first announced, the map included data types for conferences, societies, and a grab-bag called “other“, which currently contains a couple of historically-interesting morsels.

Now I’ve added two more data types:

  • businesses for commercial organisations specialising in tech comm, such as consultancies, recruiters, publishers, independent technical writers, and so on.
  • groups for smaller groups and regular meetups of technical communicators, either as part of a larger society/association, or as an independent group.

Any groups or businesses to add?

At this point there are very few businesses and groups on the map. Do you have one you’d like me to add? Please add a comment to this post, including the following information for each item. The information will be publicly available on the map, via an information box that appears when someone clicks on the relevant circle on the map:

  • Type: Conference, Society, Business, or Group
  • Name of the business, group, society or conference.
  • Description.
  • Website address (or an email address that people can use to get more information).
  • Street address (this is essential, to position the item on the map).
  • Start and end date for conferences, or meetup timing for groups (e.g. “First Wednesday of every month at lunch time”, or “Every Tuesday at 7pm”).

Note: Don’t add the names or addresses of any individuals, unless it’s your own name and address. We need to ensure we have people’s permission before adding their information in a comment on this post, or on the map. Any information you add here should be already publicly available on an organisation’s website or other publication.

Contributors to the project

Thanks to the following people who have helped me add data to the map so far: Sarah O’Keefe, Ellis Pratt, Stefan Eike.

Thanks also to Stefan Eike and Stephen Farrar, who have both contributed to the code on GitHub.

More coming

Excited? I am. 🙂 If you’d like to know more about the project, check out the introductory blog post. Soon I’ll write another post with the technical details of the APIs and other tools involved. In the meantime, here’s Tech Comm on a Map.

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