Category Archives: APIs

Report from Write the Docs Sydney, March meetup

We held the second Write the Docs meetup in Sydney on 2 March. The presentations were on moving into API technical writing, and the story of the Corilla documentation platform.

There was a good crowd at this meetup – around 20 technical writers descended on the Campaign Monitor offices in central Sydney. We were treated to a breath-taking 360-degree panorama of Sydney from the 38th floor of the building, and a couple of entertaining, informative, very different talks.

The recording of the session includes both talks, and is available on YouTube:

Presentation 1: Transitioning into API Tech Writing

The first presentation was from Priya Varghese, a technical writer at Google. Her talk was titled Transitioning into API Tech Writing. A year ago, Priya started work at Google as an API technical writer. Before that, she had many years’ experience as a tech writer for other audiences in the medical, security and education industries.

Priya talked about the questions she had before embarking on this new role, such as: How different is it from tech writing for other audiences? Do I know enough to explain APIs to developers? What if I don’t know how to code? Can API tech writing be fun? Her presentation gives an overview of APIs and the developer audience, the role of an API tech writer, the things you need to know, and the skills you need to acquire. One thing Priya strongly recommends is a mentor, and she finishes her talk by wondering if we should develop mentorship programs to guide and instruct technical writers.

Presentation 2: The Corilla Story

David Ryan, co-founder of Corilla, told the story of the development of Corilla and the forming of a startup. Corilla is an online documentation platform for technical writers, providing documentation authoring, publication and version-control tools. David’s talk was fun and educational, with intriguing glimpses of the roller-coaster ride of a startup founder.

David described how he and his team had the original idea for a new tool while working with a set of tools that was bloated, clumsy, and not designed for technical writing. Their new tool quickly became popular at Red Hat, where David was working at the time. With Red Hat’s blessing, he and his colleague branched out to form their own startup. And the rest is history. Two years later, Corilla is an alumni of the NUMA accelerator in Paris and has customers in more than 80 countries. Watch the video to hear David talk about the journey from then to now.

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Designing tutorials – some insights for API documentation

I’ve just published a blog post on the Google Geo Developers Blog, about a new design for the Google Maps API tutorials. I’d love some feedback from technical writers. If you have a few minutes, would you head on over there and let us know what you think?

What does Stack Overflow’s new documentation feature mean for tech writing?

Stack Overflow has recently announced the public beta release of its new documentation feature. That is, Stack Overflow now provides a platform for crowd-sourced documentation relating to any number of products, for the people, by the people.

For those of us managing the docs for widely-used products in particular, this means our customers may soon have access to an alternative, crowd-sourced documentation set.

What an awesome experiment for us as technical writers to follow! We’ll be able to see at first hand what our customers know they need, in terms of information about our products. Because this is Stack Overflow, the documented products are likely to be APIs, SDKs, and other developer-focused tools and technologies.

What if the documentation on Stack Overflow turns out to be voluminous and extremely useful – where would that leave us as technical writers working on proprietary doc sets? I think it will give us the opportunity to streamline our content, focusing even more than we do now on ensuring our information is up to date, and that our information architecture is the best we can make it.

In other words, we can ensure our target audiences can find what they need, even when they don’t know yet what that is.

Technical writing is hard. Information architecture is hard. The Q&A side of Stack Overflow works extremely well, because it focuses on short snippets of content that answer a particular question. It’s going to be very interesting indeed to see how well the new documentation feature works, with the more narrative demands of technical documentation.

An issue I foresee is that people will be tempted to kick off a topic, and then tire half way through and end up providing a link to the official documentation. Is that a bad thing? Tech writing know-how says our readers find it disconcerting to have to click around to find their information. It’s OK in a Q&A format, but not so good in a tutorial or step-by-step guide.

I really like Stack Overflow’s focus on sample-driven documentation!

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this development. Where do you think it’ll go within the next few months, and how about within the next two years? Will it fizzle into nothingness, or explode into something huge and beautiful? Will the original Q&A form of Stack Overflow merge into the new documentation form, becoming something new?

API documentation tools at Write the Docs NA 2016

This week I’m attending Write the Docs NA 2016. Today is a kind of pre-conference day. There are doc sprints, and an API docs meetup.

At the moment, I’m in the API docs meetup. The day starts with a few set talks, to be followed by “open space” sessions. Here are my notes on the first couple of talks about documentation tools.

Docbox and retext-mapbox-standard, from Mapbox

The first talk of the day was “REST API documentation generator” by Rafa of Mapbox. The Mapbox team writes the documentation in Markdown. In the background is Jekyll and GitHub pages. Rafa walked us through a couple of pages of the documentation, which includes code samples, generated for various programming languages, as well as hand-written words.

Tools:

  • Docbox: An open source documentation tool for REST APIs. It’s a JavaScript application written in React (a JavaScript library for building user interfaces). It includes automated testing of the code samples in the docs. This looks like a pretty interesting collections of tools to explore.
  • retext-mapbox-standard: An open source tool that checks for grammatical consistency and correct spelling. This is implemented as tests, run against the documentation. It’s written in JavaScript.

Rafa said this set of tools works really well for collaboration on writing the docs.

There was a lively discussion at Rafa’s session, with a very engaged audience. We discussed topics such as reader feedback, automated testing, size of the doc set, versioning, and more.

All this information was packed into half an hour! Thanks Rafa for a great session.

Tight coupling of API docs: YAML and custom tooling

The next session was “API documentation tooling at Capital One” by jennifer rondeau. Jennifer talked about the options and challenges for tight coupling of API documentation. Creating docs manually is not optimal. To keep your docs up to date, you need automated ways to sync your docs with your code. That’s what Jennifer means by “tight coupling”. In this talk, she’s focusing on the reference documentation, and specifically REST API reference docs.

You need to automate,  but be ready for the areas where you need human intervention:

  • Prefer a design-first rather than a code-first approach to creating an API. Jennifer’s team uses Swagger. For the most part, they use Swagger for naming conventions and exposing usable external APIs, not so much for the architectural considerations. Jennifer gave an example: Assume your development team creates a parameter that currently has only one permitted value. The parameter exists to allow for future expansion. In the external docs, remove the parameter.
  • Note that Swagger YAML is human-readable, but not really. Jennifer emphasises that Swagger-UI is not a documentation tool. Swagger is most useful for generating server and client code. So, you need doc tooling. Jennifer’s team uses tooling that converts the Swagger YAML to a markup format (Markdown or HTML), and puts it all in a single file. Then there’s a manual step to clean up the text in the generated export files. You need to clean up the arrangement of the file, then expand descriptions and so on.

Jennifer walked us through the Capital One Platform documentation, and particularly the SwiftID webhooks, which is the output of the above processes. The hello world content is manually created. The source is all AsciiDoc, either generated from the YAML or hand-written. A member of the audience commented that it was good to see the manually-written content integrated with the generated docs.

Next, Jennifer discussed a different approach: creating documentation from tests. Jennifer talked about spring-restdocs, which adds the stubs for the documentation. You can then go and add the text later. How you automate your docs depends on how you’re building your API. The docs-from tests approach is useful particularly if you use the code first approach to creating an API. Your docs must exist in order for your tests to pass.

Thanks so much, Jennifer, for these tips on how to Swagger, and the hint about sprint-restdocs.

Webinar on API technical writing with STC India

Are you interested in learning about APIs and API technical writing? Join us for a webinar, hosted by STC India. I’ll demo a couple of APIs and discuss the role of a technical writer in this area of the software industry. We’ll look at examples of API documentation, and discuss what type of documents an app developer expects when using an API.

The title of the webinar is “Introduction to API Technical Writing”. It’s intended for technical writers who know little about APIs (application programming interfaces) and want to explore the field of API technical writing. My hope is that, after attending this webinar, you’ll have the knowledge and tools you need to head off on your own explorations.

APIs (application programming interfaces) make it possible for applications to share information with each other. You could say that APIs are the communication channel of the online world. Developers need help hooking their application up to someone else’s APIs. We, as technical writers, give them that help.

Recording of the webinar [Update on 10 April 2016]: The recording of the webinar is now available on YouTube: Introduction to API Technical Writing.

Registration details: Sign up for the webinar, and read more about it on the STC India site.

Date and time: Friday 18 March 2016, at 1pm Indian time – that’s 6.30pm in Sydney. The session lasts one hour.

Who can join? Anyone. It’s free of charge, and you don’t need to be a member of the STC.

Topic overview:

  • An introduction to APIs.
  • An overview of the role of API technical writer.
  • Our audience – the developers who need our documentation to use APIs in their applications.
  • The types of API we might be asked to document.
  • Demos of 2 APIs that you can play with yourself.
  • What API documentation consists of.
  • Examples of good and popular API documentation.
  • Working with engineers.
  • Tips on getting started as an API technical writer.

Hope to “see” you at the webinar. 🙂

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