KubeCon Seattle 2018 – open source, docs, community

This week I attended the KubeCon conference in Seattle. The conference’s full name is KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018. It was huge, friendly, interesting, inspiring.

Most of the conferences I attend are tech writing conferences. This is the first time I’ve attended a highly “technical” software conference, and I wasn’t sure what to expect. Would all the sessions fly right over my head? Would the other attendees view me as an interloper? Would documentation feature at all? The answers are, “well yes some”, “no”, and “yes”!

KubeCon was huge. This year there were 8 000 attendees, which is eight times more than the last time the conference took place in Seattle, in 2016. It’s twice as many as last year, when the conference was in Austin, Texas

Part of the room in which the keynotes were held:

KubeCon revolves around Kubernetes, an open source system that helps people deploy and manage containerised applications. The Kubernetes website saw 1.8 million visitors last month. A keynote speaker, Liz Rice, remarked that these numbers make the Kubernetes website massively more popular than the Seattle Seahawks but less visited than Starbucks. What’s more, the Kubernetes readership has just started exceeding that of the Manchester United website!

A Kubeflow end-to-end workshop

I took part as teacher’s assistant (TA) for the Kubeflow end-to-end workshop, run by Michelle Casbon and Amy Unruh. Kubeflow is a framework that helps make it easier to deploy and manage machine learning systems. (I work on the Kubeflow docs.) The Kubeflow session at KubeCon took the form of a codelab which was rewarding in that it showcased some very cool technology in a graphical way, though, as is still the case with most machine learning systems, the workflow was somewhat complex. (This is something we’re working on.) I’m very pleased I was able to help many people get their apps up and running.

Awaiting the start of the Kubeflow workshop:

Notes on sessions related to open source docs and community

I blogged about some of the other sessions I attended – those related to docs and/or community:

Thanks

Thanks to the conference organisers, presenters, and attendees. I had fun, met good people, and learned a lot.

It was invigorating to attend an event where the technology and the community are thriving, growing, excited, and yes, just slightly chaotic. This year Kubernetes won the OSCON Most Impact award (OSCON = Open Source Convention). The word “community” is on everyone’s tongue, as much as the word “code”.

This is Seattle. It rained, but rain did not dampen our spirits.

Crossing from one conference building to the other in the Seattle rain:

Update on 19 December: KubeCon videos are available

The talks and other sessions are available on the Seattle ’18: KubeCon and CloudNativeCon playlist on YouTube.

About Sarah Maddox

Technical writer, author and blogger in Sydney

Posted on 14 December 2018, in open source and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Thank you for all of your write ups of the sessions you attended Sarah. You continue to be a wonderful teacher along with being an outstanding writer. We are very lucky to have you on our team. Enjoy the holidays!

    • Hallo Garry
      Thanks so much for your kind words. I’m lucky to be part of your team too. KubeCon was a great experience. I hope more tech writers get to attend upcoming KubeCons. Happy holidays to you too!
      Cheers
      Sarah

  2. The talks and other sessions are available on the Seattle ’18: KubeCon and CloudNativeCon playlist on YouTube.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: