Publishing a paperback on Kindle Direct Publishing

The printed copy of my book has arrived! That’s a good reason to talk about publishing a paperback via Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing.

First, the long-awaited arrival of a printed copy of my book, A Word If You Please. I published the book on Amazon.com in Kindle and paperback formats. Being all the way down here in Australia, it was a couple of weeks before my hard copy arrived. And now, here it is:

  

It’s about an action hero, Trilby Trench, who also happens to be a technical writer. Does her way with words bring the danger to her or does it save her from further troubles? Only Trilby can tell you that.

Publishing a paperback on KDP

It’s been a while since I last ventured into the online tools provided by Kindle Direct Publishing. I’ve previously published two novels in Kindle format.

It was a very pleasant surprise that you can now create and publish a paperback version of your book. When I last published via Kindle Direct Publishing, only the Kindle format was available. The cost model for the paperback format is print on demand: You pay Amazon a fee for each copy that someone buys.

I loved the online cover designer. You can choose your design from a range of templates. There are different templates for Kindle ebook and paperback. Upload your image, customise the colours and fonts, and submit the design.

Only one thing didn’t work quite as expected. When you publish both a Kindle version and a paperback version of the same book, they start off as separate books on Amazon.com. It’s a good idea to get them linked, so people looking at the book online can see that both formats are available. The linking is supposed to happen automatically, based on identical title, author, and some other metadata. The auto-linkage didn’t happen for me, so I contacted the Kindle Direct Publishing help desk. They replied to my request within a few hours, and the update came through within 24 hours. Excellent service!

It’s worth spending some time reading the Kindle Direct Publishing documentation, to figure out how to upload and format your content. I decided to use straight HTML for the paperback version of my book. If you go that route, you may find this article useful: How to make an Amazon Kindle book using HTML and CSS. The author of that blog post has recently posted a disclaimer saying the post is out of date. Even so, I found the overview useful, and the downloadable set of sample files too.

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About Sarah Maddox

Technical writer, author and blogger in Sydney

Posted on 5 August 2017, in book, technical writing, Trilby Trench and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Charlotte Brogden

    Congratulations! What a feeling to be holding your own novel for the first time!

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