The Making of “The Language of Content Strategy” (stc14)

This week I’m attending STC Summit 2014, the annual conference of the Society for Technical Communication. Where feasible, I’ll take notes from the sessions I attend, and share them on this blog. All credit goes to the presenters, and any mistakes are mine.

The Language of Content Strategy is a book by Scott Abel and Rahel Anne BailieIn this session at STC Summit 2014, Scott Abel discussed the content strategy, tools and technologies behind the making of the book.

Problem statement

Time, money, skills and experience are in short supply. Hand-crafting content is expensive, time consuming and not scalable.

The demands of the audience are changing. People use social media, rather than going to a specific website to gather information.

To meet the demands of content delivery today, we need to adopt manufacturing principles. The is made possible by content engineering: The application of engineering discipline to the design and delivery of content.

Case study: The making of  The Language of Content Strategy

In this session, Scott will show us how he and Rahel created a book, an eBook, a website, and a set of learning materials, from a single source, without breaking the bank. They did it by harnessing technology and crowd sourcing.

Scott talked about the differences in approach between technologists and editorialists. Conflict and time wasting arise because of a lack of a common language. Rahel and Scott wanted to craft a solution: A crowd-sourced book about content strategy that is both a case study in content engineering and a practical example of content marketing.

Setting up

The team started with careful analysis of the educational landscape, contributors, and more. Then they defined the content types they needed.

  • The smallest unit of content they would create would be a term and definition pair.
  • Another content type is an essay of 250 words.
  • Then there are contributor bios, statements of importance, and resources.

For the authoring environment, the team selected Atlassian Confluence. It’s a wiki with support for XML content re-use.

They also chose a gimmick: 52. The project included 52 terms, 52 definitions, by 52 experts, published over 52 weeks, and one of the output formats was 52 cards.

Then they selected a team of experts: the best and brightest in tangentially-related fields.

Other roles and responsibilities: markup specialist, editor, indexer, peer reviewers, and a graphic artist.

The source data

The source was authored in Confluence wiki. The content types are clearly labelled: Biography, importance statement, topic name, definition, etc.

The output

In the various output formats, the content is structured differently but still consists of the various topic types. For example, in the printed book every chapter is two pages long, and consistently structured. The eBook format is slightly different, as are the website format and the flash cards learning format.

Each Thursday, one chapter is automatically published. The web output also contains audio files, photos, and additional resources that are not contained in the book.

The advantages of a future-proofed content strategy

The team was able to add content after the fact, such as the audio files for accessibility. The content strategy was designed to future proof the content, so the team was able to adjust to challenges and opportunities. And the strategy is repeatable. Now that it’s been done, it can be done again.

Scott told an amusing story of how he disobeyed his own rules, and tried to create another channel by copying and pasting instead of using the single-sourced content. A marketing person asked him to create a slide deck from the content. He was on a plane, without WiFi, so decided to do it by cutting and pasting. Needless to say, this didn’t work. By the end of the flight he had only 13 slides of the required 52, and had run out of laptop battery!

Cost

The cost of the project came in at under $10,000USD.

  • Approximately $4000USD forgraphic design, indexing, editing, markup assistance, audio tracks and hosting, the URL for the first year, and site hosting for a year.
  • Approximately $5,440 for book donations, postage, Adobe InDesign, Confluence Wiki, and overhead/administrative costs.

Scott’s promise

Scott finished by saying that if you want to undertake a similar project, ask him. He will try to help.

This was a fun and inspiring talk. Thanks Scott!

About Sarah Maddox

Technical writer, author and blogger in Sydney

Posted on 22 May 2014, in STC, technical writing and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Scott Abel, The Content Wrangler

    Thanks for the great — and speedily published — review of my session. I really appreciate it!

  2. Thanks for posting Sarah – interesting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: